OUTPUT

"ၼွၼ်းၽၼ်ဢမ်ႇတၢၼ်ႇတူဝ်ထူပ်း သိပ်းသူပ်းဢမ်ႇတၢၼ်ႇတႃႁၼ်" *

Comments are greatly appreciated!

Peer-reviewed papers

  • Rehman, I., Silpachai, A., Levis, J., Zhao, G., & Gutierrez-Osuna, R. (2020). The English pronunciation of Arabic speakers: A data-driven approach to segmental error identification. Language Teaching Research. [link]
  • Silpachai, A. (2020). The role of talker variability in the perceptual learning of Mandarin tones by American English listeners. Journal of Second Language Pronunciation, 6(2), 209–235. [link]
  • Ding, S., Liberatore, C., Sonsaat, S., Lučić, I., Silpachai, A., Zhao, G., Chukharev-Hudilainen E, Levis J, & Gutierrez-Osuna, R. (2019). Golden speaker builder–An interactive tool for pronunciation training. Speech Communication, 115, 51-66. [link]

Reviews

  • Silpachai, A. (2018). Review of the book Investigating English Pronunciation: Trends and Directions, by Jose A. Mompean & Jonas Fouz-Gonzalez (Eds.). The CATESOL journal, 30(1). [PDF]
  • Silpachai, A. (2017). Review of the book Accent reduction for professionals: How to eliminate your accent to sound more American, in M. O'Brien & J. Levis (Eds). Proceedings of the 8th Pronunciation in Second Language Learning and Teaching Conference, ISSN 2380- 9566, Calgary, AB, August 2016 (pp. 270-273). Ames, IA: Iowa State University. [PDF]

Book chapter

  • Levis, J. & Silpachai, A. (2021, forthcoming). Speech intelligibility. In T. Derwing, M. Munro, & R. Thomson (Eds.), The Routledge Handbook of teaching speaking, (pp. ??). Routledge

Thesis

  • Silpachai, A. (2014). The temporal organization between initial consonants and lexical tones. (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA. [PDF]

Oral presentation

  • Silpachai, A. (2019). The effects of high talker variability on the perceptual learning of Mandarin tones in HVPT. The 11th Annual Conference of Pronunciation in Second Language Learning & Teaching, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ. [Slides (PDF)]

Posters

  • Silpachai, A. (2020). Prosodic structural and tonal contextual modulation of Voice Onset Time and consonant-induced fundamental frequency in the three-way laryngeal contrast in Thai. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Acoustics Virtually Everywhere.
  • Silpachai, A. (2019). The roles of vowel length and sentential context in onset pitch perturbations in Thai. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 146(4), 3013-3013. [PDF]
  • Silpachai, A. (2018). Using high variability phonetic training to train non-tonal listeners with no musical background to perceive lexical tones. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 143(3), 1953-1953. [PDF]
  • Levis, J. M. & Silpachai, A. (2017). Prominence and information structure in pronunciation teaching materials. The 9th Annual Conference of Pronunciation in Second Language Learning & Teaching, University of Utah.
  • Silpachai, A. (2017). High variability phonetic training and L2 lexical tones. The 9th Annual Conference of Pronunciation in Second Language Learning & Teaching, University of Utah.
  • Silpachai, A. (2013). The adaptation of tones in a language with registers: A case study of Thai loanwords in Mon. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 134(5), 4247-4247. [PDF]
  • Silpachai, A. (2013, June). Prosodic characteristics of two focus types in emphatic context in Thai. In Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics ICA2013 (Vol. 19, No. 1, p. 060209). ASA.
  • Silpachai, A. (2012). Prosodic characteristics of three sentence types in Thai. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 132(3), 2004-2004.

* A Shan proverb meaning "dreaming does not equal encountering (the reality). Ten mouths (of 10 people) do not equal one eye seeing." (lit: sleep/lie.down-dream-NEG-equal-body-encounter ten-mouth-NEG-equal-eye-see; Thai cognates (reconstructed ones are marked with an asterisk): นอนฝันอ่าม*ต่านตัว*ถบ สิบ*สบอ่าม*ต่านตาเห็น). Notice the contrast between the mind (cf. fantasy) and the body (cf. reality) and the contrast between hearing and seeing. As for the structure of the proverb, the final word of the first part rhymes with the second word of the second part. This is typical of proverbs in Tai languages.

The proverb is generally about not believing anything until you see it for yourself (not in your dreams or through someone else's eyes). However, I think you can also interpret the saying like this: the first part is a reminder to people who are good at planning but not at carrying out their plans (check out implementation intentions by Peter Gollwitzer). Just because you have planned to do something does not mean that that thing is already done. The second part is about people who believe what others say without thinking for themselves. This idea is important for research too. Researchers should not rely on secondary sources. In terms of personality traits according to the Big Five model, the first part seems to be about conscientiousness, whereas the second part is about agreeableness.